Browse Items (150 total)

Datu Facundo: Chief of the Unrespected

By Robert Schnurr Datu Facundo and 39 other Samal Moros tribesmen attended the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair as part of the Philippine Exhibit.[1] There they found worse treatment than other Filipinos experienced at Spain’s 1887 Madrid Exposition,…

The Changing Field of Anthropology at the Time of the St. Louis Exposition

By Madison Adams  A paradigm shift in anthropology occurred during the turn of the last century, which reflected a change in the way anthropologists thought about race. Here I discuss, William McGee head of the Department of Anthropology and…

The Collection and the Colonial Narrative

Taylor Finch The Collection and Colonial Narrative             At the close of the 1905 St. Louis World’s Fair, University of Iowa representatives traveled to St. Louis and purchased 600 items from the Philippine Exhibition.[1] These 600…

The Ultimate Failure

By Jessica Romanz The Philippine Exposition at the St. Louis World’s Fair was meant to demonstrate how successful the United States was at civilizing the Filipino people.1 The fair failed to demonstrate the idea of societal mobility and equality.…

Failure of Anthropology Days Reflects 1904 World’s Fair

By Dave ShowalterAnthropology Days at the 1904 World’s Fair were a bridge between the Olympics and the Philippine Exposition. Filipino participants competed in conventional Olympic events and in contrived indigenous activities. James Sullivan, who…

The Filipina Body as Imperial Continuity

By Heidi Kutcha The Philippine Exposition’s Departments of Exploitation and Publicity used the distribution of photographs and promotional leaflets to generate revenue before, during, and after the 1904 World’s Fair.1 These materials included…

Selling Imperialism: Photography at the St. Louis World’s Fair

By Abigail Weaver Photography was an important component of the St. Louis World’s Fair of 1904. Visitors could document their time at the fair by purchasing guidebooks, souvenir postcards, and picture albums.1 Anthropological photographs were on…

The Design of the Fair: Encouraging the Progress of Civilization

The Design of the Fair: Encouraging the Progress of Civilization By Emily Wittman The physical design of the St. Louis World’s Fair of 1904 conveys the themes of progress toward civilization, imperialism, and racial hierarchy. The Commission of…

Organizing Societies

By James CoxThe exhibition spaces of the St. Louis World's Fair and neighborhoods of St. Louis mirror each other as studies in racial segregation. William McGee, head of the Anthropology Department, designed the imperial displays of the 1904…

Antonio, Chief of the Igorrotes

By Kimberly Sheehy The Igorots were among one of the largest tribes that Taft had sent to the World’s Fair. The image of Antonio, Chief of the Igorot people, displays him using a typewriter.1 The use of the typewriter disrupts the fairgoers…